Latest Reports

  • Open Banking and APIs in Asia - A paper from Kapronasia and Red Hat
    Open Banking and APIs in Asia - A paper from Kapronasia and Red Hat Both regulatory and competitive forces have been making Open Banking a new reality across the region. Banks are now realizing that if they want tokeep their existing customers, acquire new ones, and play a greater role in their customers’ lives then they must become more customer focused, while offering a…
  • Delivering a Secure Digital Experience - A paper from Kapronasia and Jumio
    Delivering a Secure Digital Experience - A paper from Kapronasia and Jumio With the rise of digital banks and fintechs across the region, the race is on to acquire new customers. Customer experience built on new, innovative product offerings will become a key differentiator. On the other hand, the growing financial crime threats means that regulators will continue to tighten their AML/KYC…
  • 2021 Asia Pacific Fintech Trends
    2021 Asia Pacific Fintech Trends 2021 marks the tenth year that Kapronasia has produced our fintech trends report. In 2011, our focus was completely on the mainland China market, but as our business expanded, today we are present in Shanghai, Singapore, Taipei, Seoul, and Tokyo and our trends report has grown to match our footprint.

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Latest Insight

Will AirAsia's super app gambit take flight?

Written by Kapronasia || February 22 2021

Once upon a time, super apps began as e-commerce platforms or free messaging services. They tapped the network effect to build giant user bases. Because their overhead was low, they could afford to be patient about monetization. Transportation companies do not have the same luxury, especially airlines reeling from the pandemic's effect on air travel. Yet Malaysia-based AirAsia is doubling down on its super app strategy first announced last year. In March, AirAsia will expand its food delivery service airasia food from Malaysia to Singapore.

Asia's super apps will aim to cash in on fintech in 2021

Written by Kapronasia || February 18 2021

Since the advent of the internet, technology startups have disrupted one industry after another. It was only a matter of time before they set their sights on financial services.

As it turns out, banking is harder to disrupt than retail, transportation, entertainment or almost anything else. The reason is simple: Trust is paramount in banking and takes time to build, while most digital banks have yet to develop compelling value propositions.

A few of Asia's platform companies have defied this conventional wisdom. The most notable is WeChat, the Tencent-owned app that bundles messaging, digibanking, e-commerce and entertainment under the same umbrella. WeChat was not the first platform company to thrive as a fintech - Alipay was - but it was the first to harness messaging's network effect for that purpose.

SWIFT faces growing number of challengers in Asia

Written by Kapronasia || February 11 2021

It seems that almost every plucky fintech in the cross-border payments space seeks to challenge SWIFT these days. Airwallex is perhaps the best known. The Hong Kong-headquartered (but Australia-founded) unicorn boldly proclaims that it wants to rejig global payments rails at SWIFT's expense. Then there is Lightnet, which is only slightly less ambitious. Lightnet aims to dominate B2B remittances in Asia with none other than cryptocurrency, which it says will render obsolete traditional global payments methods like SWIFT and Western Union. Lightnet is focused on making cross-border payments more economical by trimming the number of intermediary parties from about five to just the sender and receiver. The company expects costs to be further trimmed as its network grows.

Can P2P lending thrive in Indonesia?

Written by Kapronasia || February 10 2021

P2P lending is one of the fastest growing fintech segments in Indonesia. Demand for credit in Southeast Asia's largest economy is strong while its availability to most Indonesians through the traditional banking system is limited. Indonesia has tens of millions of people who are either underbanked or unbanked. Either way, they cannot easily get a bank loan. P2P platforms offer a convenient alternative. As of October 2020, Indonesia's online lenders had disbursed Rp 56.16 trillion in new loans, up 24% year-on-year, while the NPL ratio was 7.58%, according to data compiled by the country's Financial Services Authority. 

Hong Kong's virtual banks have their work cut out for them

Written by Kapronasia || February 09 2021

Two years ago, Hong Kong made fintech history in Asia as the region's first major economy to greenlight digital banks. As of the end of 2020, all eight of the banks were finally live. Political and covid-related disruptions had delayed their launch. Judging by the digibanks' marketing literature, they are poised to redefine banking in Hong Kong as we know it. The reality is more nuanced.

Where is the exit ramp for Grab?

Written by Kapronasia || February 04 2021

The clock is ticking for a Grab exit. Southeast Asia's most valuable startup has been in business now for almost nine years. It has been losing money that entire time. To be sure, Grab has seen its user base, valuation and revenue grow exponentially over that time. The company has evolved from an Uber lookalike into an aspiring super app betting on digibanking to deliver it from the red ink into the black. That could be easier said than done.

Fintech firms face an uncertain future in China

Written by Kapronasia || February 03 2021

Fintech crackdowns in China tend to snowball. That was the lesson learned when Beijing began culling crypto and P2P lending firms. At first, it seemed those industry segments might survive if they could assuage regulators. It later became clear that the only way to satisfy regulators was to shut down or move into another line of business, as erstwhile P2P juggernaut Lufax did. China's fintech giants, once seemingly unassailable, now face their own day of reckoning with regulators. Ant Group and its counterparts are probably too big to fail. But they are not too big to be cut down to size.

Why did NAB buy out 86 400?

Written by Kapronasia || February 01 2021

Barely a month after Xinja's abrupt demise, another Australian neobank is exiting the market. This time though, the said bank is being bought out, not folding like an accordion. It would seem that National Australia Bank (NAB) made 86 400 an offer the neobank could not refuse to the tune of AU$220 million. Shareholders cannot complain. Australia's third-largest lender had already purchased an 18.3% stake during 86 400's Series B fundraising round and says it is paying a premium to the price investors had paid when they invested in the neobank.

How will GCash use its US$175 million capital injection?

Written by Kapronasia || January 28 2021

While many countries have experienced a surge in cashless payments during the pandemic, for the Philippines fast-tracking the financial sector's digital transformation is a game changer. The reason is that the Philippines is a fast-growing, highly connected and populous country (108 million people) that lacks payments incumbents. There are no entrenched credit card companies in the market. That means ascendant e-wallets like Mynt's GCash have the chance to become dominant players in one of Southeast Asia's largest emerging markets.

Rakuten launches Taiwan's first virtual bank

Written by Kapronasia || January 27 2021

Taiwan finally has an operational digital bank. Rakuten International Commercial Bank (RICB), backed by the Japanese e-commerce giant, recently became the first of three digibanks approved by Taiwan's Financial Supervisory Commission (FSC) to go live. RICB will initially offer deposits, fund transfer, small loan and debit card services and later expand into mortgages and corporate loans. Rakuten has had an internet bank in Japan (Rakuten Bank) for more than a decade. 

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